The first week of November in Central Ohio will feature a drastic drop in temperatures and even the first widespread freeze.

Normally, the first freeze, when temperatures fall to 32 degrees or below, happens at the end of October.

Here are a list of normal dates that cities around Ohio see their first freeze of the season:

Columbus (KCMH)     Oct 27        
Newark              Oct 18 
Bellefontaine       Oct 20 
Washington C.H.     Oct 21 
Circleville         Oct 28   

Cincinnati (KLUK)   Oct 25
Dayton (KDAY)       Oct 25
Cleveland           Oct 28
                         

While the first week of November is about a week later than normal, it’s far from anything record breaking.

The earliest that the Columbus area has hit a low of 32 degrees or below is September 21, 1962.

The latest date for Columbus to officially hit the freezing mark was the tail end of November.

Official temperature readings for the Columbus area have come from the airport since January 1, 1948, but came from a downtown location prior. Since moving to the airport, the record for latest freeze in the Columbus area is Nov 23, 2007. Since record keeping began for Columbus in 1878, the latest that a freeze was recorded was November 27, 1902 when readings were still coming from the downtown location.

As temperatures fall to the 30s, it’s important to remember to protect the 3 P’s: pets, plants & pipes.

Because of the cold, it’s important to bring the pets inside, cover any sensitive plants to prevent permanent damage from frost. As temperatures fall near freezing, it will also be important to take precautions like covering plants to make sure that a killing frost does not settle in, or consider bringing sensitive plants in for the season.

Pipes are also sensitive to the cold.  You’ll want to make sure that you are covering any exposed pipes, and unhooking outdoor hoses to prevent the pipes from freezing.

Remember it’s important to always stay weather aware.  You can do this by staying tuned to NBC4 for Central Ohio’s most accurate forecast or downloading our free mobile weather app.