Alabama won’t be ‘hit harder’ by Hurricane Dorian despite Trump warning

U.S. & World

This GOES-16 satellite image taken Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at 17:00 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian, right, churning over the Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane Dorian struck the northern Bahamas on Sunday as a catastrophic Category 5 storm, its 185 mph winds ripping off roofs and tearing down power lines as hundreds hunkered in schools, churches and other shelters. (NOAA via AP)

Despite a warning from President Donald Trump on Twitter, Alabama is not expected to be impacted by Hurricane Dorian.

National Weather Service Meteorologists told Alabama residents on Sunday not to worry about being hit by the Category 5 hurricane after Trump tweeted that Alabama was among the states that would be “hit (much) harder than anticipated.

Trump tweeted: “In addition to Florida – South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, will most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated. Looking like one of the largest hurricanes ever. Already category 5. BE CAREFUL! GOD BLESS EVERYONE!”

The National Weather Service Birmingham followed Trump’s tweet minutes later with one of their own to calm resident’s fears.

“Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian. We repeat, no impacts from Hurricane #Dorian will be felt across Alabama. The system will remain too far east. #alwx,” the National Weather Service Birmingham tweeted.

Meteorologist James Spann also responded, saying Alabama residents need not worry about the hurricane.

Hurricane Dorian pounded the northern Bahamas on Sunday as the catastrophic Category 5 storm barreled toward the islands with 180 mph winds, while authorities made last-minute pleas for those in low-lying areas to evacuate before it’s too late.

Millions from Florida to the Carolinas kept a wary eye on the slow-moving Dorian amid indications it would veer sharply northeastward after passing the Bahamas and track up the U.S. Southeast seaboard. But authorities warned that even if its core did not make U.S. landfall and stayed offshore, the potent storm would likely hammer U.S. coastal areas with powerful winds and heavy surf.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said Dorian’s maximum sustained winds have increased to 180 mph (289 kph), up from 175 mph (281 kph). It is moving west at 7 mph (11 kph). “Catastrophic conditions” are occurring in The Abaco Islands and expected across Grand Bahama later in the day, the center said.

With its 180 mph winds, Hurricane Dorian is now tied for the 4th strongest winds in the Atlantic since 1950, when record-keeping began improving.

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