3 central Ohio men, 5 others indicted in Stone Foltz alleged hazing death

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BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (WCMH) — Three men from central Ohio and five other students have been indicted by a Wood County grand jury in the death of Bowling Green State University student Stone Foltz.

  • Jacob Krinn, 20, of Delaware, Ohio, on charges of first degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Reckless Homicide, Felonious Assault, Hazing, Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws, and Obstructing Official Business;
  • Daylen Dunson, 20, of Cleveland, on charges of third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Tampering with Evidence, Obstructing Justice, Hazing, Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws, and Obstructing Official Business;
  • Troy Henricksen, 23, of Grove City, on charges of third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Reckless Homicide, Tampering with Evidence, Hazing, and Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws;
  • Canyon Caldwell, 21, of Dublin, Ohio, on charges of third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Tampering with Evidence, Hazing, Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws, and Obstructing Official Business;
  • Niall Sweeney, 21, of Erie, Pennsylvania, on charges of third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Hazing, Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws, and Obstructing Official Business;
  • Jarrett Prizel, 19, of Olean, New York, on charges of third degree felony Involuntary Manslaughter, Hazing, and Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws;
  • Aaron Lehane, 21, of Loveland, Ohio, on charges of Tampering with Evidence, Hazing, Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws, and Obstructing Official Business;
  • Benjamin Boyers, 21, of Sylvania, Ohio, on charges of Hazing and Failure to Comply with Underage Alcohol Laws. Prosecutors say the misdemeanor charges against Mr. Boyers would be dismissed for the present time.

Foltz family attorneys say the indictments are just a first step toward justice.

We are grateful for all of the hard work conducted by local law enforcement and the Prosecutor’s office, and we are confident they will make sure justice is served. However, today is just one step in the right direction. Swift action also needs to be taken by government officials and university presidents nationwide to abolish fraternity hazing. We are living every parent’s worst nightmare and will not be at peace until fraternity hazing is seen for what it truly is — abuse. It’s unacceptable, and in Stone’s case, it was fatal. How many injuries and deaths will it take for people in positions of power to do the right thing? We demand zero tolerance. Anything less will result in additional innocent lives lost and parents like us pleading for change.

Rex Elliott and Sean Alto, Cooper Elliott

Foltz, a 20-year-old from Delaware, Ohio, was a sophomore at Bowling Green. He was found dead on March 4 after an event with the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. The fraternity has been suspended and charged by BGSU with six violations of the Code of Student Conduct.

Wood County Prosecutor Paul Dobson announced the following narrative of Foltz’s death:

The indictments stem from an alleged Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity event the evening of March 4th at an off-campus house which Mr. Foltz was required to attend along with the other new members. A roommate later found Mr. Foltz unresponsive in his Bowling Green, Ohio apartment. When first responders arrived, Mr. Foltz was not breathing and was being given CPR by his roommate. Mr. Foltz was rushed to the Wood County Hospital and then transferred to Toledo Hospital, where he died on March 7th. The Lucas County Coroner ruled the death an accident as the result of a fatal level of alcohol intoxication during a hazing incident.

Wood County Prosecuting Attorney Paul Dobson

According to Elliott, Foltz was blindfolded and led into a basement for something called a “Big-Little” drinking ritual. Foltz was allegedly told to drink a bottle of alcohol before he was able to go home. Around 10:30 p.m., members of the fraternity dropped him off at his apartment, and at 11 p.m. Foltz’s roommate found him unresponsive and called 911.

Foltz was rushed to the hospital and was put on life support. His family kept him alive for four days so that he could donate his organs.

Foltz’s parents say they would like to see hazing be classified as a felony.

“I don’t want any parent, I don’t want any kid, I don’t want any brother, sister to have to go through this. This is awful,” said Shari Foltz, Stone’s mother.

Collin’s Law has been introduced at the Ohio Statehouse once again and would create harsher penalties for hazing, including making it a felony when drugs or alcohol are involved. Elliott said they’ve found at least a dozen incidents of hazing at the fraternity where Stone was pledging.

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