Politics

Dayton's Good Samaritan Hospital to be demolished after year-end closure

DAYTON, OH (WDTN) - Premier Health officials say after they close Good Samaritan Hospital later this year, they will demolish all but two buildings.

Premier Health President and CEO Mary Boosalis said the plan for the site is to make it "shovel-ready" for whatever comes next.

"All the buildings will be razed with the exception of the federally qualified health center and the parking garage," Boosalis said.

"We're going to be working with City Wide and Planning next, and engage the community to say what other needs - since they have a hospital five miles away - what other things would be beneficial in the community."

Boosalis says they're closing Good Samaritan down because - among other reasons - it's simply doesn't make economic sense to operate two hospitals within five miles of each other.

"Thirty-three per cent of the visits at Miami Valley Hospital currently are from people living in the Good Sam neighborhood," she said. "Whether it's by car, by emergency vehicle, by bus - people do in fact have access. Five miles apart is a pretty reasonable access point."

She said patients with upcoming visits or surgeries will continue as normal. But when it's down to the final stages of the move, patients will be accommodated at another facility, based on their needs.

"Our first goal is always safety of our patients and that's why we didn't want to do this quickly or without a plan," Boosalis said.

And as for the approximate two thousand staff members and health officials who work at Good Samaritan, she said: "Our goal, and I'm really proud of this, is to offer every employee a job."

Boosalis said Premier Health will work with each staff member, throughout the year to decide the best course of action for their future. She said Premier will save upwards to 8 million dollars a year in operating costs, once Good Sam is closed.

"Many of its (Good Samaritan) buildings are 30, 40 60 years old," Boosalis said. "To continue to keep the facility up to code, over the next 10 years, we'd need to spend upwards of  $90 million plus."

"While this is very disappointing news, I am gladdened to see the thoughtfulness they have put forward with regards to our community."

She said premier is donating "significant" money towards rehabilitating the site - something that was welcomed by city manager Shelley Dickstein.

"This is disappointing and bad news for the city," she said. "While this is very disappointing news, I am gladdened to see the thoughtfulness they have put forward with regards to our community."


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